Statistics Canada
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Income tax... by the numbers

2011

Image: Calculator and pencil.
Image: Calculator and pencil.

The deadline for filing most 2010 tax returns is April 30, 2011.

Here are selected data related to income tax in Canada.

(Last updated: March 11, 2011.)


Online tax-filing

Home Internet users with higher incomes were more likely than those with lower incomes to use the Internet to file income taxes in 2009.

3.7 million — The number of persons aged 16 and older in Canada who filed their income tax returns online from home (otherwise known as netfile) in 2009. This was up from 3.1 million in 2007.

18% — The percentage of home users who used the Internet to file their income tax return in 2009. Online tax filing was most common among experienced Internet users.

21% — The proportion of home Internet users with some post-secondary education who used the Internet to file their income taxes in 2009, about twice the proportion of those with no post-secondary education (10%).

Note: Data do not include people who filed their income tax returns via a professional tax preparation service, or efile. The Canada Revenue Agency maintains two systems for electronic filing: efile is available to tax professionals, and netfile to individuals.

Source: Canadian Internet Use Survey, 2009.


Personal taxes

20% — The proportion of the average household’s budget in 2009 that was spent on taxes (including federal and provincial income and payroll taxes as well as other provincial taxes, such as the land transfer tax, but not the Goods and Services Tax [GST] or Harmonized Sales Tax [HST]).

Source: Spending patterns in Canada, 2009.

Data and analysis on the subject of income, income taxes, and other aspects of this topic may also be found in Statistics by subject under Income, pensions, spending and wealth, and specifically in Personal and household taxation.


Taxes, government transfers and after-tax income

$8,800 — The median amount of federal and provincial income taxes paid by families in Canada in 2008.

$4,800 — The median amount of government transfers received by families in Canada in 2008.

$63,900 — The median after-tax income of Canadian families in 2008.

Source: “Income of Canadians,” The Daily, Thursday, June 17, 2010.

See also: Income in Canada, 2008 (includes data by province); Income, pensions, spending and wealth, found in Canada Year Book, 2010.


Taxes collected

$189.2 billion — The amount of personal income taxes collected by the federal, provincial and territorial governments in 2009.

$50.3 billion — The amount of corporate income taxes collected by the federal, provincial and territorial governments in 2009.

Source:  Canada Year Book 2010, Table 16.1 Consolidated government revenue and expenditures, 1996 to 2009.

See also: Government, found in Canada Year Book, 2010.


RRSP

Registered retirement savings plans (RRSP) are tax-advantaged savings vehicles that constitute the third pillar of the retirement income system in Canada, the other two being public pensions (OAS/GIS and CPP/QPP) and registered pension plans through an employer.

$2,680 — The median RRSP contribution in Canada in 2009, down from $2,700 in 2008.

5,967,710 — The number of tax filers who contributed to an RRSP in Canada in 2009.

$33 billion — The total value of contributions to RRSPs in Canada in 2009, down from $33.3 billion in 2008.

53% —  The percentage of male RRSP contributors in 2009, the same as in 2008.

47% — The percentage of female RRSP contributors in 2009, the same as in 2008.

45 — The average age of RRSP contributors in 2009.

Source: CANSIM, table 111-0039 (Financial Data and Charitable Donations).

8.9 million — The estimated number of employed Canadian tax filers—about 50%—who participated in a private retirement savings plan in 2008.

Source: “Participation in private retirement savings plans,” The Daily, Friday, March 26, 2010.

See also: Tables by subject: Pension plans and funds and other retirement income programs.


Charitable donations

$250 — The median charitable donation in Canada in 2009.

5.6 million — The number of Canadian taxfilers reporting charitable donations in 2009.

$7.7 billion — The total value of charitable donations for which a tax receipt was issued in Canada in 2009.

Source: Summary tables, Charitable donors.


Investment income

Investment income refers to the interest and dividend income reported by savers and/or investors from investments that are not tax-sheltered.

8.2 million — The number of Canadian taxfilers reporting income from investments in 2009, down from 8.9 million in 2008.

50.9 billion — The total value of the income from these investments in 2009, down from $51.1 billion in 2008.

Source: CANSIM, table 111-0038 (Financial Data and Charitable Donations).

See also: Income, pensions, spending and wealth: Household assets, debts and wealth in Statistics by subject.

Consult the Media Room’s Economic Indicators page for links to information on the economy, as well as definitions of the Consumer Price Index (CPI), unemployment rate and gross domestic product (GDP).


Accounting services

$13.2 billion — The operating revenue of the Canadian accounting industry in 2009.

72% — The proportion of sales of accounting, tax preparation, bookkeeping and payroll services in Canada to businesses.

20% — The proportion of sales of accounting, tax preparation, bookkeeping and payroll services in Canada to individuals.

7% — The proportion of sales of accounting, tax preparation, bookkeeping and payroll services in Canada to governments, not for profit organizations and public institutions.

2% — The proportion of sales of accounting, tax preparation, bookkeeping and payroll services outside Canada (exports).

57% — The proportion of operating expenses for accounting, tax preparation, bookkeeping and payroll services that went to salaries, wages and benefits.

Source: CANSIM, tables 360-0007, 360-0018 and 360-0019 (Annual Survey of Service Industries: Accounting Services).

See also: Summary tables, Accounting services (Canada).


Offences against the Income Tax Act (updated)

562 — The number of offences against the Income Tax Act in fiscal year 2008/2009. This was down from 604 in 2007/2008.

87% — The proportion of these offences that received a guilty verdict. This was up from 85% in 2007/2008.

Offences include not filing a completed income tax and benefit return (or tax evasion); evading compliance and or payment imposed; and all other offences pertaining to the Income Tax Act.

Note: Data for fiscal year 2008/2009 represent both youth and adult criminal courts, and cover all jurisdictions in Canada.

Source: Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, Adult Criminal Court Survey and Youth Court Survey, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.


For more information about this page or for help finding more data, contact Media Relations.

See previous features on this and on other subjects in By the numbers – archives.